Profit

Profit,
in business usage, the excess of total revenue over total cost during a specific period of time. In economics, profit is the excess over the returns to capital, land, and labour (interest, rent, and wages). To the economist, much of what is classified in business usage as profit consists of the implicit wages of manager-owners, the implicit rent on land owned by the firm, and the implicit interest on the capital invested by the firm’s owners. In conditions of competitive equilibrium, “pure” profit would not exist, because the competitive market would cause the rates of return to capital, land, and labour to rise until they exhausted the total value of the product. Should profits emerge in any field of production, the resulting increase in output would cause price declines that would eventually squeeze out profits.
The real world is never one of complete competitive equilibrium, though, and the theory recognizes that profits arise for several reasons. First, the innovator who introduces a new technique can produce at a cost below the market price and thus earn entrepreneurial profits. Secondly, changes in consumer tastes may cause revenues of some firms to increase, giving rise to what are often called windfall profits. The third type of profit is monopoly profit, which occurs when a firm restricts output so as to prevent prices from falling to the level of costs. The first two types of profit result from relaxing the usual theoretical assumptions of unchanging consumer tastes and states of technology. The third type accompanies the violation of perfect competition itself.


Related Spectrum Categories

The earnings of land, labour, and capital employed in the productive processDistribution by factor shares: wages, profits, interest, and rent


To cite this page:
“profit” Britannica Online.
<http://www.eb.com:180/cgi-bin/g?DocF=micro/482/56.html>
[Accessed 09 May 1998].
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